Honda Forza & Honda Dio – his ‘n’ hers

Since coming back to Brisbane, we have had a couple of hurdles to jump over. One of them was the death of my beloved Honda Scoopy. Actually, he’s not dead, but the part needed to fix him is not available in Australia and will cost over $500 (and three weeks) to import and install. It’s such a shame because he is otherwise pristine.

Onwards and upwards, Jeremy now has a Honda Forza which is a big, bad 300cc. Sitting on it, I feel like I am in an armchair. The best thing is that the passenger seat is super wide and quite a bit higher than the driver seat, which means I can see what’s happening in front. The bikes we rode in SE Asia were much smaller and I could only see to the sides of the road.

When Scoopy was diagnosed, I began looking for a new ride. I am now the owner of a lovely white Honda Dio. It’s a 110cc, so much more powerful than Scoopy’s 50cc’s. It’s a great bike and I find it very stable and comfortable on the road.

Here is the Backhouse/Honda family album.

Jeremy’s Honda Forza. I can’t even touch the ground.
Forza

My new Honda Dio. I can dink, y’all.

Dio

My first love, the Honda Scoopy. The only bike to have its own song. Do yourself a favour and watch it. Link below.

IMAG0318

What difference does a year make?

Sitting here on the eve of our return to Australia, and I am finding it hard to put a finger on how I feel. There is a lot to do once we get home because we both start work within a week of our arrival, so at times, the main feeling I can identify is stress/anxiety. And as Jeremy would tell you, I am coping with that very well – I am a pillar of calm. Yes, it’s true. Apart from that, I am excited about seeing everyone and moving into a new place, but I am also sad that this journey has come to its end.  One more pack of the luggage and we will be home.

Jeremy bought wine for our last night in South East Asia. Is he trying to tell me something? Is it time I started shopping in Fat Lady?

FatBird

The wine Jeremy bought for our last night in SE Asia. Is he trying to tell me something?

Having lived out of a suitcase for the last four months, and with minimal possessions for the eight months prior to that, I feel that my desire to consume has changed. When you have to carry everything you have with you, it’s interesting to discover that you can get by with very little. I’ve been thinking a lot about this and reading a lot about the minimalist movement that seems to be gaining momentum around the place. I think I am in a unique position to re-evaluate my addiction to recreational shopping, and to reconsider my attachment to all the things that I already own.

We have made a conscious decision to live in a smaller space when we get back to Brisbane. A smaller space means fewer pieces of furniture, less stuff, lower energy consumption, but on the plus side, it means more time, more money and more freedom. I am looking forward to cleaning one toilet and one bathroom per week rather than three toilets and two bathrooms. Jeremy already travels pretty light, so this will be a challenge that mainly affects me.

What difference does a year make? Who has changed their hair? Who has grown a beard? Got a tattoo? Started a new relationship? Gone paleo?

What difference did a year make to me? It can be explained by my running shoes.

Day 1 – So new, so beautiful, so fresh.

Then

Day 365 – Past their retirement date and smelly, but they have experienced a lot and they’re still up for a new challenge!

Now

What a wonderful time we have had, and what a wonderful time awaits us at home.

Be warned friends, I haven’t had my hair cut or coloured since September. That’s five months.

See you on the southern continent.

Claire x